Archives for posts with tag: Social Media

I’m sitting in the airport, getting ready to go back to reality. It’s been almost a year since I wrote my first post. In that time span a lot has changed; my world has changed. I feel like it is time for a reintroduction.

I started off lucky. I was fortunate enough to get a college internship a year and a half ago at a Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council. While the experience was great, it was the people I met during that time that I need to give thanks to, they showed me my potential.

The Executive Director of the Chapter, Jane Baxter Lynn, became a mentor to me. I would work hard, and that obviously earned her respect, but it was her passion and dedication that drove me to work harder, and be better. During my time there, I went from a college student to a communications professional. I learned the tools I needed to make it in this profession; hard work, dedication, and striving to keep things as simple as possible.

With my wings flapping, I jumped. I took my internship experience from USGBC and from my good friends at Greenlights, and aimed high. I had developed a pretty good skill set in online communications. I read blogs, tweeted, and began to understand the online landscape. With that experience, I felt it was time for more. I applied for a position at Edelman.

The first person I met at Edelman was Dave Levy. That is when I knew I was in the right place. Dave is a wealth of information, and he saw potential in me, and invited me to join Edelman’s internship program. I was extremely fortunate to become a part of a team that literally had awesome running through their veins. For as much as I learned in school, and in my two years of interning, I probably learned about twice that in the two months I interned at Edelman. That experience set me up for success; in October of this past year I was offered a full-time position,  working in Digital for Edelman.

All that has happened over the lifespan of this blog. And now, I can call myself a professional. As I have changed, so has this blog. It was once a sandbox for a college student to figure out the online space. Then it was an interactive resume for a graduate. And now, it is a sandbox once again. This time, however, it is the sandbox of a professional.

I often wonder what the new year will bring. What changes will I experience; what things will I learn. And so I leave with my one call to action: share. I want to learn about your experiences, and find out what you have learned.

Its time for me to catch my flight. I wish you safe travels and a happy new year.

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It seems that a lot of people perceive marketers and advertisers as money-grubbing evil-doers. They see them as an exploitation upon the capitalist system.

So my question is: Why aren’t more marketers and advertisers using this perception to their advantage?

Why the hell aren’t more marketers and advertisers using their perceived bad reputation to their advantage?

I pose this question because I believe that this marketing tactic could make Diaspora, a new Social Networking Platform, explode into something that could revolutionize the internet.

Diaspora is still under development so I figure I would give them a few suggestions:

  1. Don’t be afraid to piss Facebook fans off
  2. I cannot remember the last time an ad upset me because of its explicit content. For that matter, I cannot remember a time when my Grandmother was appalled by an ad. Isn’t that a problem? How are we stirring things up? Here is an opportunity for Diaspora.

  3. Revolt
  4. Facebook is everything new media marketers love. So that means that Diaspora has the opportunity to brand themselves as everything marketers would hate.

I know a lot of people would not appreciate this but I think that is the key advantage that could make a new social platform successful. And not only successful, but the best.

Facebook took from MySpace and MySpace took from AOL so Diaspora has a great opportunity

Even if Diaspora falls flat on their face, I still like theie idea. Because they have the chance to frame themselves as David where Facebook is already a well know Goliath. One must remember that Facebook took from MySpace and even MySpace took from AOL. So perhaps it is Diaspora’s turn to take.

I want to leave with a related question, who is going to take from Apple? Who is going to make Google the Goliath?

Imagine walking through the digital world we have created. In tight clusters you would find the urban, nuanced societies who pride themselves on exclusivity. Further out you would find the suburban platforms that resonate with Middle America values and images of smiling families. As you venture further from the epicenters of activity you find the start-ups; the new entrants, and the average citizens of our world.

The difference between this digital journey and a drive from Manhattan to Albany is the fact that the digital world is connected at such a quicker rate. What once was a drive of an hour and a half (with no traffic) has become the span of a .06 Google Search.

This proximity to one another means that the late entrants keep up more easily with the early adopters… in theory. However the early adopters are so interconnected that they move at an exponentially faster rate when adopting new technology and ideas. This leaves that middle ground in a constant stretch between innovation and accommodation.

I consider those in that middle ground the most fascinating. These are the successful organizations who implement new technology strategically and try to observe best practices already in use by the early adopters. They are the ones who will dictate the future of our technological advances.

So as I try to progress my knowledge of the technological world I try to be unique in my observation of innovation. I try to discipline myself to look at those in the middle ground before just jumping on board with ideas set by the innovators. The lesson is, just like in our reality, to not ride the technological trends, but find the strategies and ideas with staying power. Because those are the ones that will be there when the technological interstellar dust settles.

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