Archives for posts with tag: communication strategy

Have you ever heard of the metaphor “river of information?” Well when explaining what it is that I do to people who do not live for communications, I sort of run with this analogy.

Communication is made up of messages. Consider these like droplets of water within a river. There are several different ways that water travels, messages are no different. Messages go through cycles just like water; they are sent down a stream, received, and turned into feedback just like the water cycle.

So messages are like water in a river. There many different types of waterways within which water travels, messages are no different. There are so many different channels of communication out there; consider these like different waterways. There are some large waterways, like rivers, and there are some that are only tributaries that sprout from larger rivers. Communications channels are no different; there are large channels like the web, television, print. And there are tributaries that flow from these large channels of communication. For example, Twitter is a tributary of the web; much like the NY Times is a stream stemming from Print.

So that sets up my world, a world in which I am a navigator. I help organizations pour their messages into streams in a method that will best help that message be received well.

The cool thing is that this analogy can be extended further; my colleagues and I are all essentially navigators, but some are better at guiding certain streams and rivers than others.

I happen to be a fairly good captain of the digital sea; I have experience in online communications thus that is where I can best help an organization send its message. However because I have fundamental skills in navigating one communications channel, that skill can be applied to other communication channels. It also means that because I have experience sending one kind of message, that skill can be translated to a different type of message. For example, I have experience in email marketing to external groups, however that navigation skill can be applied to internal communications as well.

In my role, I do more than just keep an organization afloat.

This is the best possible way I can explain what it is that I do. And the irony is that my role is much like the role of any sea-captain; you don’t know the name of the captain of the Titanic, do you? But you remember the blunder that happened because of the captain. My role is similar because I help enhance the way an organization is remembered; the only difference is that in my role I strive to do more than just keep the organization afloat.

It seems that a lot of people perceive marketers and advertisers as money-grubbing evil-doers. They see them as an exploitation upon the capitalist system.

So my question is: Why aren’t more marketers and advertisers using this perception to their advantage?

Why the hell aren’t more marketers and advertisers using their perceived bad reputation to their advantage?

I pose this question because I believe that this marketing tactic could make Diaspora, a new Social Networking Platform, explode into something that could revolutionize the internet.

Diaspora is still under development so I figure I would give them a few suggestions:

  1. Don’t be afraid to piss Facebook fans off
  2. I cannot remember the last time an ad upset me because of its explicit content. For that matter, I cannot remember a time when my Grandmother was appalled by an ad. Isn’t that a problem? How are we stirring things up? Here is an opportunity for Diaspora.

  3. Revolt
  4. Facebook is everything new media marketers love. So that means that Diaspora has the opportunity to brand themselves as everything marketers would hate.

I know a lot of people would not appreciate this but I think that is the key advantage that could make a new social platform successful. And not only successful, but the best.

Facebook took from MySpace and MySpace took from AOL so Diaspora has a great opportunity

Even if Diaspora falls flat on their face, I still like theie idea. Because they have the chance to frame themselves as David where Facebook is already a well know Goliath. One must remember that Facebook took from MySpace and even MySpace took from AOL. So perhaps it is Diaspora’s turn to take.

I want to leave with a related question, who is going to take from Apple? Who is going to make Google the Goliath?

While this notion is pure charity aligned, it has been the campaign call for way too long. Somehow we need to generate a new way to market charitable giving. There needs to be a new shift in advertising intrinsic benefits and a new method to spread the word. We need to look up the word “help” in the thesaurus and come up with alternatives that have never been heard before. Shake the foundation to get dust to fall from the ceiling.

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